I'm Sakura, and I'm a Thronie.

Follow me for approximately 80% Game of Thrones / Song of Ice and Fire, 15% Victorian and Steampunk fashion, and 5% Star Trek / Doctor Who / history / assorted geekery.

20th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from Fripperies and Fobs with 317 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

Dress ca. 1880

From the Digitalt Museum

Tagged: victorianfashion

19th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from Fripperies and Fobs with 4,461 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

Evening dress, 1900-01

From the Digitalt Museum

Tagged: victorianfashion

18th March 2013

Photo reblogged from Inspiring Dresses with 53 notes

inspiringdresses:

Dress, 1879, BritishV&A Museum
 

According to the donor, this dress was worn by her mother on her wedding day in 1879. It could have been her ‘going away’ ensemble, or it could have been the dress she wore for the actual ceremony. Because weddings in those days took place in the morning, daywear with long sleeves and high necks was the acceptable style. For her wedding a woman often selected a coloured dress that would serve as a ‘best dress’ for years to come. By 1880 the skirt was quite slender in profile, often with an overskirt swathed in front, gathered over the bustle at the back and falling into a train. The horizontal bands of applied frills and ruching on the skirt are typical decoration for this period. The bodice is tight-fitting and designed to suggest a jacket.


For her wedding a woman often selected a coloured dress that would serve as a ‘best dress’ for years to come.
Why don’t people do this anymore?! Fuck a “wear it once” dress.

inspiringdresses:

Dress, 1879, British
V&A Museum

 

According to the donor, this dress was worn by her mother on her wedding day in 1879. It could have been her ‘going away’ ensemble, or it could have been the dress she wore for the actual ceremony. Because weddings in those days took place in the morning, daywear with long sleeves and high necks was the acceptable style. For her wedding a woman often selected a coloured dress that would serve as a ‘best dress’ for years to come. By 1880 the skirt was quite slender in profile, often with an overskirt swathed in front, gathered over the bustle at the back and falling into a train. The horizontal bands of applied frills and ruching on the skirt are typical decoration for this period. The bodice is tight-fitting and designed to suggest a jacket.

For her wedding a woman often selected a coloured dress that would serve as a ‘best dress’ for years to come.

Why don’t people do this anymore?! Fuck a “wear it once” dress.

Tagged: victorianfashionwedding dressfashion favorite

14th March 2013

Photo reblogged from Inspiring Dresses with 21 notes

inspiringdresses:


Wedding Dress, 1879, FrenchMet Museum

More fabulous non-white wedding wear.

inspiringdresses:

imageimageimage

Wedding Dress, 1879, French
Met Museum

More fabulous non-white wedding wear.

Tagged: victorianfashionwedding dress

14th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from Fripperies and Fobs with 328 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

Dress, 1884-85

From the Museum of London

Tagged: victorianfashion

6th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from Fripperies and Fobs with 219 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

Worth dress ca. 1890

From Vintage Textile

Tagged: victorianfashionfashion favoritegorgeous

2nd March 2013

Photo reblogged from Inspiring Dresses with 149 notes

inspiringdresses:

I.W. Caley’s Wedding Dress, 1875, AmericanIndianapolis Museum of Art

Ellen Seppings wore this dress when she married Josiah Pratt Clowes in England.
In the 1870s, the style of skirts changed from a full-bell shape to the half-bell shape, creating a flatter, smoother effect in the front and moving fullness towards the back, using the bustle.
The tradition of using orange blossoms came to the West from China through the ancient Silk Road. During the Crusades, the custom was brought from the East to Spain and then to the rest of Europe.
The orange blossom is a symbol of fertility because it is one of the few trees that blooms and bears fruit at the same time.


I love the silhouette on this.

inspiringdresses:

I.W. Caley’s Wedding Dress, 1875, American
Indianapolis Museum of Art

Ellen Seppings wore this dress when she married Josiah Pratt Clowes in England.

In the 1870s, the style of skirts changed from a full-bell shape to the half-bell shape, creating a flatter, smoother effect in the front and moving fullness towards the back, using the bustle.

The tradition of using orange blossoms came to the West from China through the ancient Silk Road. During the Crusades, the custom was brought from the East to Spain and then to the rest of Europe.

The orange blossom is a symbol of fertility because it is one of the few trees that blooms and bears fruit at the same time.

I love the silhouette on this.

Tagged: fashionvictorianwedding dress

1st March 2013

Photoset reblogged from Inspiring Dresses with 67 notes

inspiringdresses:

Wedding Dress, 1874, American
Chicago History Museum

Here’s todays PSA that wedding dresses were not always universally white.

Tagged: wedding dressfashionvictorianpsa

25th February 2013

Photo reblogged from Fripperies and Fobs with 473 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

Day dress ca. 1877 from “Impressionism and Fashion” at the Musee d’Orsay via nuescha

fripperiesandfobs:

Day dress ca. 1877 from “Impressionism and Fashion” at the Musee d’Orsay via nuescha

Tagged: victorianfashion

18th February 2013

Photo reblogged from Fripperies and Fobs with 45 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

Abraham & Straus mourning cape, 185-1900
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art

fripperiesandfobs:

Abraham & Straus mourning cape, 185-1900

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tagged: victorianfashionAccessories

8th February 2013

Photo reblogged from Old Rags with 330 notes

oldrags:

Evening dress of silk brocade, ca 1841-46, Sudley House
See some bigger images here.

oldrags:

Evening dress of silk brocade, ca 1841-46, Sudley House

See some bigger images here.

Tagged: victorianfashion

5th February 2013

Photo reblogged from Fuck Yeah, Victorians! with 1,931 notes

omgthatdress:

Fedora
1885
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Fun fact!  The fedora was originally a woman’s hat.  The legendary Victorian actress Sarah Bernhardt first wore the hat in a play called Fédora where she played the role of Princess Fédora.  The hat was immediately a hit, and soon fashionable ladies everywhere were wearing Fédora hats.  It wasn’t until later in the 20th century that the style made its way onto men’s heads. Something to keep in mind every time you see some douchebag MRA in a fedora complaining about how bitches never date nice guys like him.

omgthatdress:

Fedora

1885

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Fun fact!  The fedora was originally a woman’s hat.  The legendary Victorian actress Sarah Bernhardt first wore the hat in a play called Fédora where she played the role of Princess Fédora.  The hat was immediately a hit, and soon fashionable ladies everywhere were wearing Fédora hats.  It wasn’t until later in the 20th century that the style made its way onto men’s heads. Something to keep in mind every time you see some douchebag MRA in a fedora complaining about how bitches never date nice guys like him.

Tagged: fashionfedoravictorianwomen

Source: omgthatdress

2nd February 2013

Photo reblogged from Fuck Yeah, Victorians! with 709 notes

fugaciternelle:

Il Penseroso by Sir John Everett Millais

fugaciternelle:

Il Penseroso by Sir John Everett Millais

Tagged: victorianfashionart

Source: fugaciternelle

2nd February 2013

Photoset reblogged from Fripperies and Fobs with 648 notes

fripperiesandfobs:

23skidoo:

obligeme:

Evening gowns of the 1860s

The top middle one is from that Phantom of the Opera movie.  It’s not period.

^^^

Tagged: victorianfashion

Source: obligeme

30th January 2013

Photo with 3 notes

I spotted these brassy cufflinks at a business called MySuit near Herald Square.
RT GEAR CUFFLINKS - RHODIUM

I spotted these brassy cufflinks at a business called MySuit near Herald Square.

RT GEAR CUFFLINKS - RHODIUM

Tagged: steampunkmen's fashionfashionmenswearaccessoriescufflinks